Francesca Woodman’s photographs explore issues of gender and the self, looking at the representation of the body, and more specifically at how her own body relates to the world and her surroundings. Born in Denver, Colorado, Woodman studied at Rhode Island School of Design from 1975 to 1978, spending the final year of her studies on an exchange programme in Rome. She had previously lived in Italy with her artist parents during her youth, and later lived in New York. Woodman was interested in Surrealism and Symbolism, particularly the work of Max Klinger. She began to take photographs from around the age of thirteen or fourteen until her suicide at the age of twenty-two. Despite her short career, she produced a significant and influential body of work.

 

"Typical of Woodman’s work in the way they cast the female body as simultaneously physical and immaterial, these photographs and the evocative title they share are apt choices to encapsulate the work of an artist whose legacy has been unavoidably colored by her tragic personal biography and her death, at age 22, by suicide. In less than a decade, Woodman produced a fascinating body of work―in black and white and in color―exploring gender, representation, sexuality and the body through the photographing of her own body and those of her friends." From Francesca Woodman: On Being an Angel by Anna Tellgren 


A documentary on her life on Amazon Prime: 

The Woodmans LINK TO AMAZON

A fascinating, unflinching portrait of the late photographer Francesca Woodman, told through the young artist's work (including experimental videos and journal entries) and remarkably candid interviews with her artist parents.

 

 

Five things to know: Francesca Woodmanfrom the Tate Modern : Link to Tate Modern Article

 

Meet the acclaimed photographer who created surreal, humorous and at times painfully honest images

 

Francesca Woodman, ‘Untitled, from Polka Dots Series, Providence, Rhode Island’ 1976

Francesca Woodman
Untitled, from Polka Dots Series, Providence, Rhode Island 1976 
ARTIST ROOMS Tate and National Galleries of Scotland
© and courtesy Charles Woodman / Estate of Francesca Woodman and DACS, 2019

1. SHE WAS BORN TO BE CREATIVE

Francesca Woodman was born on 3 April 1958 in Denver, Colorado. Her father, George, was a painter, her mother, Betty, was a sculptor and her brother, Charles, is an electronic artist. Woodman started taking photographs when she was 13 years old. She moved to New York in 1979 with the dream of pursuing a career in fashion photography.

2. SHE TOOK INSPIRATION FROM SURREALISM AND FASHION

Francesca Woodman, ‘Untitled, from Eel Series, Venice, Italy’ 1978

Francesca Woodman
Untitled, from Eel Series, Venice, Italy 1978 
ARTIST ROOMS Tate and National Galleries of Scotland
© and courtesy Charles Woodman / Estate of Francesca Woodman and DACS, 2019

Woodman attended the Rhode Island School of Design in 1975. She idolised fashion photographers, such as Guy Bourdin and Deborah Turbeville. This influence is noticeable in the way Woodman sensitively used clothing throughout her works.

While studying in Rome during 1977–78, Woodman regularly visited the Maldoror bookshop, which specialised in books on surrealism. There she learnt about the pioneers of this movement, including Man Ray and Meret Oppenheim. Woodman applied some of the characteristics associated with surrealism to her own work. She created dreamlike environments with interesting and unusual objects, such as shells and eels, and combined familiar things in unfamiliar contexts to evoke uncanny feelings. She transformed extremely limited and unpromising environments into spaces of fantasy and experimentation.

3. HER BODY WAS THE SUBJECT OF HER WORK

Francesca Woodman, ‘Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island’ 1976

Francesca Woodman
Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island 1976 
ARTIST ROOMS Tate and National Galleries of Scotland
© and courtesy Charles Woodman / Estate of Francesca Woodman and DACS, 2019

During her career, Woodman produced over 800 black and white photographs. She featured as the subject in many of them, sometimes partially clothed, naked, disguised, hidden or a blur. She used ordinary objects and materials, such as mirrors and pegs, to transform her body parts into distorted and surreal versions. She experimented with glass panels, pressing them against her body to squeeze, reshape and flatten her flesh to make her physical features appear grotesque and exaggerated. When questioned about why she was the subject of her own photographs, Woodman replied 'It’s a matter of convenience, I’m always available'.

4. SHE BLURRED HER IMAGE TO CREATE MOVEMENT

Francesca Woodman, ‘Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island’ 1975–8

Francesca Woodman
Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island 1975–8 
ARTIST ROOMS Tate and National Galleries of Scotland
© and courtesy Charles Woodman / Estate of Francesca Woodman and DACS, 2019

Woodman used long shutter speed and double exposure when photographing so that she could actively feature in her own work. This also meant that she could capture different stages of movement, in a way that could trace the pattern of time. As a result, her image is blurred, which suggests motion and urgency.

Am I in the picture? Am I getting in or out of it? I could be a ghost, an animal or a dead body, not just this girl standing on the corner …?
Francesca Woodman

5. HER WORK HAS INFLUENCED AND CONTINUES TO INFLUENCE ARTISTS

Francesca Woodman, ‘Untitled, from Angel Series, Rome, Italy’ 1977

Francesca Woodman
Untitled, from Angel Series, Rome, Italy 1977 
ARTIST ROOMS Tate and National Galleries of Scotland
© and courtesy Charles Woodman / Estate of Francesca Woodman and DACS, 2019

Although she died very young, there is no denying that Woodman was one of the most innovative and promising artists of her generation. She pushed the boundaries of experimental photography and played with the potential of shutter speed and exposure. Cindy Sherman (known for her conceptual portraits) and conceptual artist Sophie Calle(whose photography examines human identity and intimacy) both nod to Woodman as a huge influence on their own work.

She had few boundaries and made art out of nothing: empty rooms with peeling wallpaper and just her figure. No elaborate stage set-up or lights … Her process struck me more the way a painter works, making do with what’s right in front of her, rather than photographers like myself who need time to plan out what they’re going to do.
Cindy Sherman